• Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    A crucial step has been taken to address growing concerns about the international trade of human organs as Australia passed its first anti-slavery bill in the New South Wales (NSW) upper house on May 3.

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    More than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh.

    In some parts of India such donations are increasingly saving lives. Donated organs are being transported across cities and even states by using “green corridors” that ensure that traffic is stopped to save vital minutes so that the organ is transplanted in time. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

  • Fank Inter Press Service | 30 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Maged Srour

    Human Trafficking for Organs: Ending abuse of the Poorest

    Organ transplantation is one of the most incredible medical achievements of the past century. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “human organs for transplants have two sources, deceased donors and living donors; ultimately, human organs can only be derived from a human body, and thus any action in the field of organ transplantation must be carried out in accordance with the highest ethical and professional standards”. The reality is that in several countries such as India, Pakistan, Egypt or Mexico, organ trafficking has been peaking in recent years...

  • NZ financial neutrality New Zealand Ministry of Health | 17 April 2018
    [page link]


    New Zealand covers costs of leave for living donors in the spirit of financial neutrality

    Summary of compensation procedure:

    You register for compensation with the Ministry of Health while you're being tested to become a donor.

    Then you apply for compensation for loss of earnings when you have a date for donation surgery.

    Please contact the Ministry as soon as possible if you would like to discuss your options. For further information, call the Ministry of Health: freephone 0800 855 066 or access their website here


  • CoE rejects GKE RT News | 08 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Euro chiefs brand US-backed health program as ‘organ trafficking’

    The Council of Europe’s Committee on Organ Transplantation has rejected a US-backed organ-swapping plan as “human organ trafficking” over concerns that donors will be abused. According to the committee, organ-swapping, as proposed by the Global Kidney Exchange (GKE), goes against the fundamental rule of organ donation – that “the human body and its parts shall not give rise to financial gain or comparable advantage.”

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    A crucial step has been taken to address growing concerns about the international trade of human organs as Australia passed its first anti-slavery bill in the New South Wales (NSW) upper house on May 3.

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    More than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh.

    In some parts of India such donations are increasingly saving lives. Donated organs are being transported across cities and even states by using “green corridors” that ensure that traffic is stopped to save vital minutes so that the organ is transplanted in time. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

  • Fank Inter Press Service | 30 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Maged Srour

    Human Trafficking for Organs: Ending abuse of the Poorest

    Organ transplantation is one of the most incredible medical achievements of the past century. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “human organs for transplants have two sources, deceased donors and living donors; ultimately, human organs can only be derived from a human body, and thus any action in the field of organ transplantation must be carried out in accordance with the highest ethical and professional standards”. The reality is that in several countries such as India, Pakistan, Egypt or Mexico, organ trafficking has been peaking in recent years...

  • NZ financial neutrality New Zealand Ministry of Health | 17 April 2018
    [page link]


    New Zealand covers costs of leave for living donors in the spirit of financial neutrality

    Summary of compensation procedure:

    You register for compensation with the Ministry of Health while you're being tested to become a donor.

    Then you apply for compensation for loss of earnings when you have a date for donation surgery.

    Please contact the Ministry as soon as possible if you would like to discuss your options. For further information, call the Ministry of Health: freephone 0800 855 066 or access their website here


  • CoE rejects GKE RT News | 08 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Euro chiefs brand US-backed health program as ‘organ trafficking’

    The Council of Europe’s Committee on Organ Transplantation has rejected a US-backed organ-swapping plan as “human organ trafficking” over concerns that donors will be abused. According to the committee, organ-swapping, as proposed by the Global Kidney Exchange (GKE), goes against the fundamental rule of organ donation – that “the human body and its parts shall not give rise to financial gain or comparable advantage.”

  • Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


     

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

Guatemala - a pediatric transplant program

Development of pediatric transplantation in Guatemala

Excavating the Organ Trade: An Empirical Study of Organ Trading Networks in Cairo, Egypt

S. Columb


Screen Shot 2016-09-05 at 8.39.09 PM

2016; Epub August 27

Legislative action in response to the organ trade has centred on the prohibition of organ sales and the enforcement of criminal sanctions targeting ‘trafficking’ offences. This paper argues that the existing law enforcement response is not only inadequate but harmful. The analysis is based on empirical data gathered in Cairo, Egypt, among members of the Sudanese population who have either sold or arranged for the sale of kidneys. The data suggest that prohibition has pushed the organ trade further underground increasing the role of organ brokers and reducing the bargaining position of organ sellers, leaving them exposed to greater levels of exploitation.

Read the complete article freely here.

Better buy than die?

Scroll IndiaScroll.in | August 3, 2016

[read the article]


By Sanjay Nagral

Back in 2004, in an editorial for the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics on a kidney transplant racket, I began by saying, "In our scandal-prone Indian public life, one scandal distinguishes itself by the amazing regularity with which it hits the headlines every few years. The only variation is its shift from one city to another as if in planned rotation. Thanks to the desperation, ingenuity and collusion of the players involved, the Indian kidney bazaar, as it was crudely described at some stage in its history, refuses to die down."

I ended the piece by offering a rather polemical solution: "The battle against this practice must be fought at two levels. The first is in the realm of the law and monitoring agencies. The second is an ideological battle against what is essentially a violation of human rights and a form of social exploitation of the worst kind. Otherwise, we will suffer the same cycle of rackets being exposed periodically."

That statement, though not meant to be a prediction, has unfortunately turned out to be true. The latest act in this sordid saga is the one currently playing out in a Mumbai hospital. While the Human Organ Transplant Act of 1994 partly succeeded in curbing the then blatant kidney bazaar that thrived in the 70s and 80s, periodic exposés since then show that it continues in a more discreet fashion...

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