• Eygpt law changeEgypt Today | 24 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Egypt Today Staff

    Gross penalties for human organ trafficking in new law

    The recently amended law on human organ transplant includes severe penalties for human organ trafficking and for violating the rules and provisions on organ transplant and transfer. The House of Representatives approved a proposed law submitted by the government to amend some provisions of Law No. 5 of 2010 on organ transplant on 12 June, 2017...

  • Bangladesh More family MembersThe Daily Star | 18 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Daily Star Staff Correspondent

    More family members can donate organs says draft law on transplant

    The cabinet approved a draft law expanding the list of relatives who could donate organs to a person. The draft also mentions stricter rules to check organ trafficking and trade. Once the law is enforced, grandparents, grandchildren, and first cousins would be able to donate organs. The existing law allows only parents, spouses, children, siblings and blood-related aunts and uncles to donate...

  • Inquiry-into-Human-Organ-Trafficking-and-Organ-Transplant-TourismThe Human Rights Sub-Committee of the Parliament
    [link to contribute]


     

    Help Australia take action against organ trafficking

    The Human Rights Sub-Committee of the Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade has commenced an inquiry into international human organ trafficking. The inquiry will examine how the Australian legal system deters organ trafficking and what more can be done to prevent this offence from occurring both in Australia and internationally.

    Contribute to parliamentary inquiry by making a submission and encourage others to do so. Follow link to contribute...

  • Media27July2017IISD | 27 June, 2017
    [read the article]

    By Ana Maria Lebada

    Governments, Stakeholders Advise Leveraging SDGs to Combat Human Trafficking

    Multi-stakeholder participants gathered for a one-day informal interactive hearing convened by the UNGA President in preparation for a High-Level Meeting on the Appraisal of 2010’s UN Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons.

    Many participants noted that three of the SDGs (5.2, 8.7 and 16.2) address human trafficking, and outlined the need to consider this issue in a multidisciplinary and comprehensive way...

  • News3FirstPost | 27 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    Watch: Wealth and Poverty keep Pakistan's Illegal Organ Trafficking Trade alive

    In Lahore, doctors have been conducting an illegal organ trafficking trade, supported by the unwillingness of the rich and desperation of the poor...

  • News Corp Australia Network  24 June 2017News Corp Australia Network | 24 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sue Dunlevy

    Tough new laws to crack down on illegal organ trade to be considered by parliamentary inquiry

    TOUGH new penalties to deter the illegal trade in human organs will be examined by a federal parliamentary inquiry after a News Corp investigation exposed the chilling business...

  • Egypt-Independent- -14-June-2017Egypt Independent | 14 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    Parliament approves death penalty for human organ traffickers

    Health Minister Ahmed Emad al-Din said on Tuesday that the Parliament has approved the draft law introduced from his ministry that aims to stricken punitive measures against human organ traffickers...

  • Eygpt law changeEgypt Today | 24 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Egypt Today Staff

    Gross penalties for human organ trafficking in new law

    The recently amended law on human organ transplant includes severe penalties for human organ trafficking and for violating the rules and provisions on organ transplant and transfer. The House of Representatives approved a proposed law submitted by the government to amend some provisions of Law No. 5 of 2010 on organ transplant on 12 June, 2017...

  • Bangladesh More family MembersThe Daily Star | 18 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Daily Star Staff Correspondent

    More family members can donate organs says draft law on transplant

    The cabinet approved a draft law expanding the list of relatives who could donate organs to a person. The draft also mentions stricter rules to check organ trafficking and trade. Once the law is enforced, grandparents, grandchildren, and first cousins would be able to donate organs. The existing law allows only parents, spouses, children, siblings and blood-related aunts and uncles to donate...

  • Inquiry-into-Human-Organ-Trafficking-and-Organ-Transplant-TourismThe Human Rights Sub-Committee of the Parliament
    [link to contribute]


     

    Help Australia take action against organ trafficking

    The Human Rights Sub-Committee of the Parliament’s Joint Standing Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade has commenced an inquiry into international human organ trafficking. The inquiry will examine how the Australian legal system deters organ trafficking and what more can be done to prevent this offence from occurring both in Australia and internationally.

    Contribute to parliamentary inquiry by making a submission and encourage others to do so. Follow link to contribute...

  • Media27July2017IISD | 27 June, 2017
    [read the article]

    By Ana Maria Lebada

    Governments, Stakeholders Advise Leveraging SDGs to Combat Human Trafficking

    Multi-stakeholder participants gathered for a one-day informal interactive hearing convened by the UNGA President in preparation for a High-Level Meeting on the Appraisal of 2010’s UN Global Plan of Action to Combat Trafficking in Persons.

    Many participants noted that three of the SDGs (5.2, 8.7 and 16.2) address human trafficking, and outlined the need to consider this issue in a multidisciplinary and comprehensive way...

  • News3FirstPost | 27 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    Watch: Wealth and Poverty keep Pakistan's Illegal Organ Trafficking Trade alive

    In Lahore, doctors have been conducting an illegal organ trafficking trade, supported by the unwillingness of the rich and desperation of the poor...

  • News Corp Australia Network  24 June 2017News Corp Australia Network | 24 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sue Dunlevy

    Tough new laws to crack down on illegal organ trade to be considered by parliamentary inquiry

    TOUGH new penalties to deter the illegal trade in human organs will be examined by a federal parliamentary inquiry after a News Corp investigation exposed the chilling business...

  • Egypt-Independent- -14-June-2017Egypt Independent | 14 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    Parliament approves death penalty for human organ traffickers

    Health Minister Ahmed Emad al-Din said on Tuesday that the Parliament has approved the draft law introduced from his ministry that aims to stricken punitive measures against human organ traffickers...

  • The-Malta-Independent-Online- -14-June-2017The Malta Independent Online | 14 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Helena Grech

    Malta conference: Confidant of Pope praises ‘Nordic Model’ on prostitution to fight slavery

    The conference focuses on sharing models and best practices to end modern day slavery and restore dignity to its victims. It has been organised by the Amersi Foundation, the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, Vatican City and the President’s Foundation for the Wellbeing of Society...

  • amazon.com- -6-June-2017amazon.com | 6 June, 2017
    [read the article]


    By Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch MD

    Handbook of Kidney Transplantation

    Concise, readable, practical and well-illustrated, the sixth edition of the Handbook of Kidney Transplantation has been thoroughly updated and revised to reflect the most current knowledge and practice in the field. Ideal for physicians, surgeons, fellows, and nurses who manage kidney transplant patients, it covers everything from treatment options for end-stage renal disease to transplantation, post-operative management and transplant immunology, focusing on every key aspect of the clinical practice of kidney transplantation.

Paid Living Donation and Growth of Deceased Donor Programs

Ghahramani, N


Transplantation Journal

2016;100: 1165-1169

Limited organ availability in all countries has stimulated discussion about incentives to increase donation. Since 1988, Iran has operated the only government-sponsored paid living donor (LD) kidney transplant program. This article reviews aspects of the Living Unrelated Donor program and development of deceased donation in Iran. Available evidence indicates that in the partially regulated Iranian Model, the direct negotiation between donors and recipients fosters direct monetary relationship with no safeguards against mutual exploitation. Brokers, the black market and transplant tourism exist, and the waiting list has not been eliminated. Through comparison between the large deceased donor program in Shiraz and other centers in Iran, this article explores the association between paid donation and the development of a deceased donor program. Shiraz progressively eliminated paid donor transplants such that by 2011, 85% of kidney transplants in Shiraz compared with 27% across the rest of Iran's other centers were from deceased donors. Among 26 centers, Shiraz undertakes the largest number of deceased donor kidney transplants, most liver transplants, and all pancreas transplants. In conclusion, although many patients with end stage renal disease have received transplants through the paid living donation, the Iranian Model now has serious flaws and is potentially inhibiting substantial growth in deceased donor organ transplants in Iran.

Read the complete article in Transplantation here (subscription required).

Our body parts shouldn’t be for sale

Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
[read the article]


By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

 

In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

 

Human rights and world culture: The diffusion of legislation against the organ trade


Fikresus Fikrejesus Amahazion

Article first published online: 9 Dec 2015, DOI:10.1080/02732173.2015.1108887

Sociological Spectrum

Abstract

Due to the process of globalization, rapid medical and technological advances, and the persistence of the global scarcity in organs, the organ trade has grown to become an international issue of increasing concern. Over the past several decades, more than 100 countries have passed legislation banning the commercial trade in organs. What explains this rapid, global diffusion of commercial transplantation laws, and what are the key factors influencing legislation? This study explores these questions through an analysis based on sociology’s world culture, world polity theory. Utilizing survival analysis models, the study covers 127 countries from 1965-2012. Results offer support for the world culture/world polity theoretical framework, while economic development also impacts legislation. The global trend toward legislation is influenced by global, cultural, and economic factors.

 

Full text available here from Sociological Spectrum (subscription required).

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