• Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • Kidney trafficking broker faces courtKhmer Times | 20 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Buth Reaksmey Kongkea

    Kidney trafficking broker faces court

    An alleged member of an organ trafficking ring was charged yesterday over a year-long kidney sale operation involving at least 10 victims.

    Construction worker Cheoun Thi, 38, of Phnom Penh was accused of unlawful removal of organs with purpose and “the act of selling, buying or exchanging a person”, which includes selling, buying or exchanging organs.

    The charges, laid in Phnom Penh Municipal Court, fall under the Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation. They carry a jail term of up to 15 years...

  • Nigerians warnedBuzzNigeria | 18 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Iheoma Hendy

    Kidney Trafficking: Federal Goverment Alarmed Over High Rate Of Practice, Expose Hospitals

    The health ministry has written to the Nigerian Medical Association to warn all doctors in relevant specialties to create awareness for Nigerians intending to travel to Egypt for medical attention.

    The memo by the Director for Hospital services, Dr Wapada I. Balami for the Minister of Health entitled, "41 suspected illegal human kidney traffickers on the trail in Egypt" raises concern about patients possibly seeking treatment abroad and their doctors referring them to any complicit hospital...

  • Kidney for sale - Iran has a legal market for the organsLos Angeles Times | 15 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Shashank Bengali and Ramin Mostaghim

    'Kidney for sale': Iran has a legal market for the organs, but the system doesn't always work

    The advertisements are scrawled in marker on brick walls and tree trunks, and affixed to telephone utility boxes, sidewalks and a road sign pointing the way to one of Iran’s leading hospitals.

    “Kidney for sale,” read the dozens of messages, accompanied by phone numbers and blood types, splashed along a tree-lined street opposite the Hasheminejad Kidney Center in Tehran.

    New ads appear almost daily. Behind each is a tale of individual woe — joblessness, debt, a family emergency — in a country beset by economic despair.

  • Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplantsThe Express Tribune | 26 September 2017
    [read the article]


    By Tribune Correspondent

    Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplants

    The FIA has arrested eight people, including a surgeon, for being involved in an illegal kidney transplant racket in Nowshera, officials said on Tuesday. “It [kidney transplantation] was being carried out illegally where poor people were offered some money for donating their kidneys,” said Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) official Mumtaz...

  • Why kidney rackets in India flourishHindustan Times | 04 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sanchita Sharma

    Why kidney rackets in India flourish with impunity

    The lynchpin of the most unprecedented racket was Amit Kumar (pic), who has no training in medicine or surgery. He has instead shown skill in evading the law, changing names and moving cities several times each time he secured bail after an arrest.

    Each year, more than two lakh (100,000) people need new kidneys but only 8,000 get them. The demand-supply mismatch creates a space for organ rackets where fake doctors carry out surgeries and forge documents to show donors and recipients as family...

  • Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • Kidney trafficking broker faces courtKhmer Times | 20 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Buth Reaksmey Kongkea

    Kidney trafficking broker faces court

    An alleged member of an organ trafficking ring was charged yesterday over a year-long kidney sale operation involving at least 10 victims.

    Construction worker Cheoun Thi, 38, of Phnom Penh was accused of unlawful removal of organs with purpose and “the act of selling, buying or exchanging a person”, which includes selling, buying or exchanging organs.

    The charges, laid in Phnom Penh Municipal Court, fall under the Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation. They carry a jail term of up to 15 years...

  • Nigerians warnedBuzzNigeria | 18 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Iheoma Hendy

    Kidney Trafficking: Federal Goverment Alarmed Over High Rate Of Practice, Expose Hospitals

    The health ministry has written to the Nigerian Medical Association to warn all doctors in relevant specialties to create awareness for Nigerians intending to travel to Egypt for medical attention.

    The memo by the Director for Hospital services, Dr Wapada I. Balami for the Minister of Health entitled, "41 suspected illegal human kidney traffickers on the trail in Egypt" raises concern about patients possibly seeking treatment abroad and their doctors referring them to any complicit hospital...

  • Kidney for sale - Iran has a legal market for the organsLos Angeles Times | 15 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Shashank Bengali and Ramin Mostaghim

    'Kidney for sale': Iran has a legal market for the organs, but the system doesn't always work

    The advertisements are scrawled in marker on brick walls and tree trunks, and affixed to telephone utility boxes, sidewalks and a road sign pointing the way to one of Iran’s leading hospitals.

    “Kidney for sale,” read the dozens of messages, accompanied by phone numbers and blood types, splashed along a tree-lined street opposite the Hasheminejad Kidney Center in Tehran.

    New ads appear almost daily. Behind each is a tale of individual woe — joblessness, debt, a family emergency — in a country beset by economic despair.

  • Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplantsThe Express Tribune | 26 September 2017
    [read the article]


    By Tribune Correspondent

    Eight arrested in Nowshera for illegal kidney transplants

    The FIA has arrested eight people, including a surgeon, for being involved in an illegal kidney transplant racket in Nowshera, officials said on Tuesday. “It [kidney transplantation] was being carried out illegally where poor people were offered some money for donating their kidneys,” said Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) official Mumtaz...

  • Why kidney rackets in India flourishHindustan Times | 04 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sanchita Sharma

    Why kidney rackets in India flourish with impunity

    The lynchpin of the most unprecedented racket was Amit Kumar (pic), who has no training in medicine or surgery. He has instead shown skill in evading the law, changing names and moving cities several times each time he secured bail after an arrest.

    Each year, more than two lakh (100,000) people need new kidneys but only 8,000 get them. The demand-supply mismatch creates a space for organ rackets where fake doctors carry out surgeries and forge documents to show donors and recipients as family...

  • From Yemen to EgyptMiddle East Eye | 30 September 2017
    [read the article]


    By MEE contributor

    Misery of Yemen's organ donors: 'It is better to starve to death'

    Ali was desperate for work. War had engulfed Yemen, he had eight children to support and he couldn't get enough jobs as a labourer to make ends meet. In early 2016 he yet again found himself walking up and down the streets near the Qat market in al-Sonaina, a quiet and poor neighbourhood of the Yemeni capital Sanaa...

  • Rewarding families WebsiteScroll.in | 28 September 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral, Vivek Jha & Dominique Martin

    Rewarding families of deceased organ donors is an ethical minefield, especially in India

    India, with its history of organ trade rackets, should be cautious before proposing incentives that may be on the slippery slope towards organ commerce.

    In September, the Central government announced plans to set up a fund for families of people who have donated organs after brain stem death. The fund will support the education of children of deceased donors as well as medical expenses of other family members...

Organ Donation and Transplantation in Central America

Transplantation


 Garcia-Gallont R, Matesanz R, Delmonico FL.

2015, 99(3):459-60

Central America, as constituted by the Republics of Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama, is characterized by highly diverse social and economic levels reflected by the Human Development Index, ranging from 0.614% for Nicaragua to 0.765 for Costa Rica, and by the percent of Gross Domestic Product dedicated to Public Health Services (ranging from 1.2% in Guatemala to 6.6 in Costa Rica). This has a direct impact on access to transplantation services for the population and on the advancement of deceased donation programs. It is therefore not surprising that only Costa Rica and Panama (and recently El Salvador) have national transplant organizations as part of, and dependent of, and financed by their Ministries of Health. A trend that correlates the Human Development Index with the total number of kidney transplants per year, particularly in developing countries,1–4 is also found in Central America (Figure 1)...

Read the complete article in Transplantation here (subscription required).

Organ donation in Israel: Achievements and Challenges

Ashkenazi, T., Lavee, J., Mor, E. 


Transplantation

2015; 99(2):265-6

 

Israel's organ transplantation history dates back to 1964 when the first kidney transplantation from a living related donor was performed; the first kidney transplantation from a deceased donor followed in 1965. Currently, organ transplantations are performed in 6 Israeli medical centers with 6 kidney, 3 liver, 3 heart, and 2 lung transplantation programs.

Read the complete report at Transplantation here (subscription required).

 

Consensus Conference on Best Practices in Live Kidney Donation: Recommendations to Optimize Education, Access, and Care


D. LaPointe Rudow, R. Hays, P. Baliga, D. J. Cohen, M. Cooper, G. M. Danovitch, M. A. Dew, E. J. Gordon, D. A. Mandelbrot, S. McGuire, J. Milton, D. R. Moore, M. Morgievich, J. D. Schold, D. L. Segev, D. Serur, R. W. Steiner, J. C. Tan, A. D. Waterman, E. Y. Zavala and J. R. Rodrigue

AJT

Article first published online: 3 FEB 2015, DOI: 10.1111/ajt.13173

Abstract

Live donor kidney transplantation is the best treatment option for most patients with late-stage chronic kidney disease; however, the rate of living kidney donation has declined in the United States. A consensus conference was held June 5–6, 2014 to identify best practices and knowledge gaps pertaining to live donor kidney transplantation and living kidney donation. Transplant professionals, patients, and other key stakeholders discussed processes for educating transplant candidates and potential living donors about living kidney donation; efficiencies in the living donor evaluation process; disparities in living donation; and financial and systemic barriers to living donation. We summarize the consensus recommendations for best practices in these educational and clinical domains, future research priorities, and possible public policy initiatives to remove barriers to living kidney donation.

Read the complete article here (subscription to AJT required).

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