• What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • DICG Statement on GKEP

    Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group concerning ethical objections to the proposed Global Kidney Exchange Program


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.

     


    In accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Istanbul and the Guiding Principles of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) is committed not only to discouraging practices and policies that directly or indirectly contribute to organ trafficking and transplant tourism but also to supporting the development and strengthening of equitable programs of donation and transplantation around the world....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

  • Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • DICG Statement on GKEP

    Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group concerning ethical objections to the proposed Global Kidney Exchange Program


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.

     


    In accordance with the principles of the Declaration of Istanbul and the Guiding Principles of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) is committed not only to discouraging practices and policies that directly or indirectly contribute to organ trafficking and transplant tourism but also to supporting the development and strengthening of equitable programs of donation and transplantation around the world....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

  • Bonds of lifeThe Japan News | 27 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By The Yomiuri Shimbun

    Bonds of life — the Organ Transplant Law 20 years on

    The Yomiuri Shimbun writes in a five part installment on the Organ Transplant Law in Japan and the 20 years after it came in practice.

    The article link focus on desperate recipients who has traveled to other countries for transplantation, but for a fuller understanding of the situation in Japan, read all five.

  • Should you be allowed to sell your kidneyGizmodo Media Group | 09 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Whitney Kimball

    Should You Be Allowed to Sell Your Kidney?

    Giz Asks, talked to bioethicists, disagreeing doctors and the World Health Organization about their opinions...

  • Kidney trafficking broker faces courtKhmer Times | 20 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Buth Reaksmey Kongkea

    Kidney trafficking broker faces court

    An alleged member of an organ trafficking ring was charged yesterday over a year-long kidney sale operation involving at least 10 victims.

    Construction worker Cheoun Thi, 38, of Phnom Penh was accused of unlawful removal of organs with purpose and “the act of selling, buying or exchanging a person”, which includes selling, buying or exchanging organs.

    The charges, laid in Phnom Penh Municipal Court, fall under the Law on Suppression of Human Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation. They carry a jail term of up to 15 years...

  • Nigerians warnedBuzzNigeria | 18 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Iheoma Hendy

    Kidney Trafficking: Federal Goverment Alarmed Over High Rate Of Practice, Expose Hospitals

    The health ministry has written to the Nigerian Medical Association to warn all doctors in relevant specialties to create awareness for Nigerians intending to travel to Egypt for medical attention.

    The memo by the Director for Hospital services, Dr Wapada I. Balami for the Minister of Health entitled, "41 suspected illegal human kidney traffickers on the trail in Egypt" raises concern about patients possibly seeking treatment abroad and their doctors referring them to any complicit hospital...

  • Kidney for sale - Iran has a legal market for the organsLos Angeles Times | 15 October 2017
    [read the article]


    By Shashank Bengali and Ramin Mostaghim

    'Kidney for sale': Iran has a legal market for the organs, but the system doesn't always work

    The advertisements are scrawled in marker on brick walls and tree trunks, and affixed to telephone utility boxes, sidewalks and a road sign pointing the way to one of Iran’s leading hospitals.

    “Kidney for sale,” read the dozens of messages, accompanied by phone numbers and blood types, splashed along a tree-lined street opposite the Hasheminejad Kidney Center in Tehran.

    New ads appear almost daily. Behind each is a tale of individual woe — joblessness, debt, a family emergency — in a country beset by economic despair.

Financial Incompatibility and Paired Kidney Exchange:Walking a Tightrope or Blazing a Trail?

A. C. Wiseman1, and J. S. Gill


AJT logo

Epub; 7 December 2016

Editorial:

In this issue, Rees et al advance a novel strategy to increase living donor kidney transplantation through kidney paired exchange (KPE). Global kidney exchange (GKE) proposes the use of biologically compatible but “financially incompatible” living donors and recipients from an underserved country to increase KPE in the United States. The health care savings generated by removing US patients from dialysis would be used to cover the cost of transplantation and posttransplant care including immunosuppressant drugs for the recipient in their home country for a period of 5 years in exchange for the compatible pair’s participation in KPE. The report describes the first application of GKE in which an indigent biologically compatible married couple in the Philippines who could not afford to proceed with living donor kidney transplantation was brought to the United States where the wife’s donation of a kidney ultimately facilitated KPE transplants for 10 American patients as well as for her husband.

While we applaud Rees et al’s efforts to advance a novel approach to increase living donor kidney transplantation, there are numerous considerations that require equipoise, including the legality of this new definition of “financial incompatibility.” The Charlie Norwood Act amended the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) to allow human organ paired donation between biologically incompatible living donors and recipients. The use of compatible donors and recipients on the basis of financial incompatibility may not be encompassed in current interpretation of NOTA. While the authors offer a thoughtful rebuttal to this consideration, expansion of GKE would probably require amendment of NOTA.The risk of exploitation (real or potential) in GKE is a significant concern...

Read the full editorial here

Opposition to irresponsible global kidney exchange

Francis L. Delmonico & Nancy L. Ascher


AJT logo

Epub; 2 August 2017

Letter to the Editor:

We are writing in opposition to the proposed “global kidney exchange” that would solicit living donors from economically underdeveloped countries such as Mexico, the Philippines, Kenya, India, and Ethiopia. The experience of representatives from countries such as India and Mexico reported at the Vatican Pontifical Academy of Sciences Summit on the topic of organ trafficking in February 2017 was very clear—these locations are sites of organ trafficking. The capacity of this project to ensure that targeted donors in underdeveloped countries will be emotionally related, free of coercion, and fully informed of risk is not feasible when the culture is so experienced with organ sales. Vendors will be readily solicited to sell their kidneys despite the “global kidney exchange” disclaimer that “commercial interest should be carefully ruled out in such kind of exchange with careful selection.”

In a pending application to the European Commission for funding, the “global kidney exchange” proposes “to match one incompatible pair with another and a scoring rubric developed to find the best possible match, utilizes each nation’s unique assets.” The notion of a living donor as a marketable “unique asset” in the context of soliciting “willing” individuals to undergo nephrectomy in underdeveloped countries is an unacceptable concept. To target economically underdeveloped countries to solicit donors when there is no assurance about the ultimate care of the living organ donor (or the absence of coercion) is unethical. What deliverable framework is being provided about the well-being of this exchange donor in an underdeveloped country that may have reliable medical care at 5, 15, and more years after nephrectomy? The risk of kidney failure in the lifetime of a donor is dependent on proper care. Successful programs of paired donation in the United States, Korea, or Europe do not exploit economic deprivation to identify matches and, again, have the capacity to care for the living donor in the long term.Targeting economically underdeveloped countries to solicit donors is an unacceptable tactic when there may be no reliable/available long-term care of the donor.

The inadequacy of using a program of “global kidney exchange” in, for example, India becomes evident in a current description of paired donation in India: “The leading cause of morbidity and mortality after kidney transplantation in India is Infection. Better HLA matched kidney transplantation for the compatible pairs will result in better long term outcome and need of re-transplantation which is common cause of sensitization.” To link kidney exchange in descriptive sequenced sentences to a reduction in infection—as a validation of such an exchange program—should elicit a responsible concern of implementing “global kidney exchange” in an underdeveloped country,especially in India, where organ trafficking is reported regularly in the media. Finally, the “global kidney exchange” program has suggested there will be oversight by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and The Transplantation Society (TTS). That contention is not correct; both the WHO and TTS oppose the introduction of this “global kidney exchange” program.

Link to letter here

Epistemic Communities, Human Rights, and the Global Diffusion of Legislation against the Organ Trade

F. Amahazion


Social Sciences

2016; Epub October 27

Abstract

Over the past several decades, over 100 countries have passed legislation banning commercial organ transplantation. What explains this rapid, global diffusion of laws? Based on qualitative data from in-depth interviews, historical analysis, and secondary sources, this paper explores the role played by the medical epistemic community and human rights in the global spread of laws against the organ trade. In addition to shaping, guiding, and influencing norms and approaches to transplantation, the epistemic community has been instrumental in the development of various resolutions, policy initiatives, recommended practices, statements, legislation, and model laws. Moreover, the epistemic community helped position the organ trade as an issue of societal and global importance, and it persistently encouraged states to undertake actions, such as implementing legislation, to combat the organ trade. Critically, the epistemic community’s efforts against the organ trade incorporated the concepts of human rights, integrity, and dignity, which had diffused globally and become institutionalized in the period after WWII.

Read the complete article courtesy of Social Sciences here.

DICG Login