• GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts Gulf Times | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts

    Qatar reaffirmed on Saturday its support for concerted international efforts to develop ethical programmes for the donation and cultivation of human organs throughout the world. HE the Minister of Public Health Dr Hanan Mohamed al-Kuwari made the remarks during a meeting discussing the establishment of organ transplant programmes around the world, as part of the ongoing meetings of the World Health Assembly in Geneva since Monday...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo Ahram Online | 18 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo

    Egypt’s interior ministry said on Friday it had arrested a number of people running an organ trafficking ring in Cairo.

    In an official statement, the interior ministry said the members of the ring had encouraged Egyptians on lower incomes in Cairo’s Ramses district to sell their organs.

    Three suspected members of the ring were arrested; one of the suspects, a butcher, had been given a 15-year prison term in a human trafficking case previously...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • GAEBA Media Release
    [read the full statement]


    Global eyecare community to unveil new ethical agreement for use of eye tissue

    Barcelona Thursday 14th June 2018: Members of the global eyecare and eye bank community unveiled the world’s first global Agreement on the use of donated human tissue for ocular transplantation, research, and future technologies, named the Barcelona Principles: An Agreement on the use of human donated tissue for ocular transplantation, research and future technologies.

     

    Read the Barcelona Agreement [here]

  • What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange programs International Policy Headlines | 08 June 2018
    [read the article]


    What should countries in the Global South do about Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) programs?

    Critics of GKE programs argue that it would offer financial and symbolic incentives that have the potential of promoting organ trafficking, that it wrongly assumes that low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) do not offer organ transplantation to those who need it, and would add barriers to the efforts that LMICs countries are already doing to improve their responses to end-stage renal failure and organ trafficking...

  • Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts Gulf Times | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Qatar reaffirms its support to organ donation efforts

    Qatar reaffirmed on Saturday its support for concerted international efforts to develop ethical programmes for the donation and cultivation of human organs throughout the world. HE the Minister of Public Health Dr Hanan Mohamed al-Kuwari made the remarks during a meeting discussing the establishment of organ transplant programmes around the world, as part of the ongoing meetings of the World Health Assembly in Geneva since Monday...

  • Donor organ rumors refuted in Geneva China Daily | 26 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By China Daily

    China to share organ transplant expertise

    Huang Jiefu, chairman of the China National Organ Donation and Transplantation Committee and also a former vice-minister of health, was speaking at a side event, entitled "Towards Universal Access to Solid Organ Transplantation", during the 71st World Health Assembly, which is running from May 21-26...

  • Proposed Bill to prohibit Canadians participating in organ trafficking abroad  Epoch Times | 23 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Omid Ghoreishi

    Senate Committee Hears from Experts on Human Organ Trafficking

    Senators in the upper house’s human rights standing committee heard on May 23 about why Canada should have its own legislation to combat organ trafficking. Bill aims to make it a criminal offence for Canadians to procure an organ abroad that was taken by force...

  • Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo Ahram Online | 18 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Egyptian police arrest organ trafficking ring in Cairo

    Egypt’s interior ministry said on Friday it had arrested a number of people running an organ trafficking ring in Cairo.

    In an official statement, the interior ministry said the members of the ring had encouraged Egyptians on lower incomes in Cairo’s Ramses district to sell their organs.

    Three suspected members of the ring were arrested; one of the suspects, a butcher, had been given a 15-year prison term in a human trafficking case previously...

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    In some parts of India donations are increasingly saving lives. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. But more than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

Towards Improving the Transfer of Care of Kidney Transplant Recipients


J. S. Gill, A. J. Wright, F. L. Delmonico and K. A. Newell

Article first published online: 25 July 2016, doi: 10.1111/ajt.13997

cover

Abstract

Kidney transplant recipients require specialized medical care and may be at risk for adverse health outcomes when their care is transferred. This document provides opinion-based recommendations to facilitate safe and efficient transfers of care for kidney transplant recipients including minimizing the risk of rejection, avoidance of medication errors, ensuring patient access to immunosuppressant medications, avoidance of lapses in health insurance coverage, and communication of risks of donor disease transmission. The document summarizes information to be included in a medical transfer document and includes suggestions to help the patient establish an optimal therapeutic relationship with their new transplant care team. The document is intended as a starting point towards standardization of transfers of care involving kidney transplant recipients.

 

Full text available here from the American Journal of Transplantation

Financial Incompatibility and Paired Kidney Exchange:Walking a Tightrope or Blazing a Trail?

A. C. Wiseman1, and J. S. Gill


AJT logo

Epub; 7 December 2016

Editorial:

In this issue, Rees et al advance a novel strategy to increase living donor kidney transplantation through kidney paired exchange (KPE). Global kidney exchange (GKE) proposes the use of biologically compatible but “financially incompatible” living donors and recipients from an underserved country to increase KPE in the United States. The health care savings generated by removing US patients from dialysis would be used to cover the cost of transplantation and posttransplant care including immunosuppressant drugs for the recipient in their home country for a period of 5 years in exchange for the compatible pair’s participation in KPE. The report describes the first application of GKE in which an indigent biologically compatible married couple in the Philippines who could not afford to proceed with living donor kidney transplantation was brought to the United States where the wife’s donation of a kidney ultimately facilitated KPE transplants for 10 American patients as well as for her husband.

While we applaud Rees et al’s efforts to advance a novel approach to increase living donor kidney transplantation, there are numerous considerations that require equipoise, including the legality of this new definition of “financial incompatibility.” The Charlie Norwood Act amended the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) to allow human organ paired donation between biologically incompatible living donors and recipients. The use of compatible donors and recipients on the basis of financial incompatibility may not be encompassed in current interpretation of NOTA. While the authors offer a thoughtful rebuttal to this consideration, expansion of GKE would probably require amendment of NOTA.The risk of exploitation (real or potential) in GKE is a significant concern...

Read the full editorial here

Opposition to irresponsible global kidney exchange

Francis L. Delmonico & Nancy L. Ascher


AJT logo

Epub; 2 August 2017

Letter to the Editor:

We are writing in opposition to the proposed “global kidney exchange” that would solicit living donors from economically underdeveloped countries such as Mexico, the Philippines, Kenya, India, and Ethiopia. The experience of representatives from countries such as India and Mexico reported at the Vatican Pontifical Academy of Sciences Summit on the topic of organ trafficking in February 2017 was very clear—these locations are sites of organ trafficking. The capacity of this project to ensure that targeted donors in underdeveloped countries will be emotionally related, free of coercion, and fully informed of risk is not feasible when the culture is so experienced with organ sales. Vendors will be readily solicited to sell their kidneys despite the “global kidney exchange” disclaimer that “commercial interest should be carefully ruled out in such kind of exchange with careful selection.”

In a pending application to the European Commission for funding, the “global kidney exchange” proposes “to match one incompatible pair with another and a scoring rubric developed to find the best possible match, utilizes each nation’s unique assets.” The notion of a living donor as a marketable “unique asset” in the context of soliciting “willing” individuals to undergo nephrectomy in underdeveloped countries is an unacceptable concept. To target economically underdeveloped countries to solicit donors when there is no assurance about the ultimate care of the living organ donor (or the absence of coercion) is unethical. What deliverable framework is being provided about the well-being of this exchange donor in an underdeveloped country that may have reliable medical care at 5, 15, and more years after nephrectomy? The risk of kidney failure in the lifetime of a donor is dependent on proper care. Successful programs of paired donation in the United States, Korea, or Europe do not exploit economic deprivation to identify matches and, again, have the capacity to care for the living donor in the long term.Targeting economically underdeveloped countries to solicit donors is an unacceptable tactic when there may be no reliable/available long-term care of the donor.

The inadequacy of using a program of “global kidney exchange” in, for example, India becomes evident in a current description of paired donation in India: “The leading cause of morbidity and mortality after kidney transplantation in India is Infection. Better HLA matched kidney transplantation for the compatible pairs will result in better long term outcome and need of re-transplantation which is common cause of sensitization.” To link kidney exchange in descriptive sequenced sentences to a reduction in infection—as a validation of such an exchange program—should elicit a responsible concern of implementing “global kidney exchange” in an underdeveloped country,especially in India, where organ trafficking is reported regularly in the media. Finally, the “global kidney exchange” program has suggested there will be oversight by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO) and The Transplantation Society (TTS). That contention is not correct; both the WHO and TTS oppose the introduction of this “global kidney exchange” program.

Link to letter here

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