• Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration of Istanbul (DoI), a working group of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) has prepared a draft update to the Declaration. The revisions made in this 2018 Edition are intended to ensure that the DoI remains a valuable source of ethical guidance for health professionals and policy makers during the next decade in the face of persisting and emerging challenges in organ trafficking and transplant tourism around the world. To achieve this goal, we need your help.

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

  • Council of Europe convention against organtrafficking enters into force Council of Europe Convention | 1 March 2018
    [read the article]


    By Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs

    Trafficking in human organs: Council of Europe convention enters into force

    The Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs entered into force today in the five first states that have so far ratified it: Albania, Czech Republic, Malta, the Republic of Moldova and Norway.

    The convention, the first international treaty aimed at preventing and combating trafficking in human organs, has been signed by another seventeen states...

  • Israeli organ-smuggling mastermind arrested in Cyprus [read the article]


    By AFP

    Israeli organ-smuggling ‘mastermind’ arrested in Cyprus

    PRISTINA, Kosovo — The Israeli ringleader of a global gang of organ traffickers has been arrested in Cyprus, Kosovan police said on Saturday.

    Moshe Harel is suspected of organizing dozens of illegal kidney transplants at the Medicus clinic in the capital Pristina in 2008, and is the man being held, according to local media...

  • Indias laws on organ transplants do little to protect rights of organ donors [read the article]

    [read the Vidhi Report]


    By Menaka Rao

    The legal framework needs to ensure that the donor gives informed consent as well as legal and medical aid for donors.

    In August 2016, Surat resident Brijkishore Jaiswal needed a kidney transplant and was all set to receive one from Shobha Thakur, a 42-year-old domestic worker from rural Gujarat. But in order to get the kidney, Jaiswal tried to pass Thakur off as his wife and said that she was donating the organ altruistically. Jaiswal was paying Thakur for her kidney and thus breaking the law, which bans commercial organ donation...

  • What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


    To celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Declaration of Istanbul (DoI), a working group of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group (DICG) has prepared a draft update to the Declaration. The revisions made in this 2018 Edition are intended to ensure that the DoI remains a valuable source of ethical guidance for health professionals and policy makers during the next decade in the face of persisting and emerging challenges in organ trafficking and transplant tourism around the world. To achieve this goal, we need your help.

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

  • Council of Europe convention against organtrafficking enters into force Council of Europe Convention | 1 March 2018
    [read the article]


    By Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs

    Trafficking in human organs: Council of Europe convention enters into force

    The Council of Europe Convention against Trafficking in Human Organs entered into force today in the five first states that have so far ratified it: Albania, Czech Republic, Malta, the Republic of Moldova and Norway.

    The convention, the first international treaty aimed at preventing and combating trafficking in human organs, has been signed by another seventeen states...

  • Israeli organ-smuggling mastermind arrested in Cyprus [read the article]


    By AFP

    Israeli organ-smuggling ‘mastermind’ arrested in Cyprus

    PRISTINA, Kosovo — The Israeli ringleader of a global gang of organ traffickers has been arrested in Cyprus, Kosovan police said on Saturday.

    Moshe Harel is suspected of organizing dozens of illegal kidney transplants at the Medicus clinic in the capital Pristina in 2008, and is the man being held, according to local media...

  • Indias laws on organ transplants do little to protect rights of organ donors [read the article]

    [read the Vidhi Report]


    By Menaka Rao

    The legal framework needs to ensure that the donor gives informed consent as well as legal and medical aid for donors.

    In August 2016, Surat resident Brijkishore Jaiswal needed a kidney transplant and was all set to receive one from Shobha Thakur, a 42-year-old domestic worker from rural Gujarat. But in order to get the kidney, Jaiswal tried to pass Thakur off as his wife and said that she was donating the organ altruistically. Jaiswal was paying Thakur for her kidney and thus breaking the law, which bans commercial organ donation...

  • What are red marketsInternational Business Times | 09 December 2017
    [read the article]


    By Lara Rebello

    ‘What are red markets? World's major organ trafficking countries bank on poverty and desperation

    A recent investigative piece into the conditions of African migrants stuck in Libya raised the curtain on the underground slave trade rings in the country and triggered international calls for investigations into the matter. It also shed light on the organ market that has been burgeoning alongside — banking on the bodies of financially desperate migrants. The migrant crisis in Africa as well as other parts of the world has offered organ traffickers a steady flow of donors — willing or unwilling — to sever ties with their kidneys, livers and other body parts....

  • How Indians were trafficked for organs in EgyptThe Indian Times | 23 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Sumitra Debroy

    ‘Donate your kidney or face jail in Cairo’

    Yaseer Ahmed Basha (29) father to a six-year-old son and a three-year-old daughter, is unaware that he too is now an accused in the international kidney racket for selling his left kidney to Malad resident Pankaj Rao. He maintained that he was threatened and tricked into giving his kidney after he went to Cairo in July with the promise of driving an Uber cab. "It was 99% deception, but 1% my greed for money." He now makes a living driving an autorickshaw to support his parents there and his family in Taloja...

  • Some U.S. Hospitals Dont Put Americans First for Liver TransplantsProPublica and Fox 8 WVUE New Orleans| 20 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By Charles Ornstein and Lee Zurik

    Some U.S. Hospitals Don’t Put Americans First for Liver Transplants

    At a time when there aren’t enough livers for ailing Americans, wealthy foreigners fly here for transplants.

    Dr. Gabriel M. Danovitch, Honoury member of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group, talks about national self sufficiency in organ donation.

    Also see Fox 8 News video on this co-published story...

  • Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospitals kidney transplantation licenceHindustan Times | 17 November 2017
    [read the article]


    By HT Correspondent

    Delhi govt suspends Apollo Hospital’s kidney transplantation licence

    The Delhi government has ordered the suspension of Indraprastha Apollo Hospitals’ licence for kidney transplants till January 5 after police busted a kidney racket involving secretarial staff of doctors working at the hospital last year.

    During the suspension period, the hospital cannot register new kidney transplant patients, but close to 40 patients who have been cleared by the committee for transplantation will continue with their treatment...

Our body parts shouldn’t be for sale

Washington PostThe Washington Post | December 29, 2015
[read the article]


By Francis Delmonico and Alexander Capron

Organ transplants have extended and improved the lives of more than a million patients over the past 60 years. This is a testament to the dedication and creativity of medical professionals as well as to the generosity of both living and deceased organ donors.

Nonetheless, the rising rate of kidney disease means that some patients won’t get the transplant they’re waiting for. That shortage of organs has led to proposals to lift the prohibition on payment that has been part of U.S. organ donation law since 1984. But buying organs would be wrong. And aside from being wrong, it would also harm existing, voluntary donation programs and be ineffective in increasing the supply of organs. There are better ways to increase the number of organs donated than paying for donations.

 

In recent decades, thousands of organs have been bought from the destitute around the world, for transplantation into the social elite in their own countries or “transplant tourists” from other nations. This has tarnished the reputation of organ transplantation and led to poor medical outcomes. In all countries, it is the poor who sell organs as a way out of their financial straits — usually only temporarily...

 

Human rights and world culture: The diffusion of legislation against the organ trade


Fikresus Fikrejesus Amahazion

Article first published online: 9 Dec 2015, DOI:10.1080/02732173.2015.1108887

Sociological Spectrum

Abstract

Due to the process of globalization, rapid medical and technological advances, and the persistence of the global scarcity in organs, the organ trade has grown to become an international issue of increasing concern. Over the past several decades, more than 100 countries have passed legislation banning the commercial trade in organs. What explains this rapid, global diffusion of commercial transplantation laws, and what are the key factors influencing legislation? This study explores these questions through an analysis based on sociology’s world culture, world polity theory. Utilizing survival analysis models, the study covers 127 countries from 1965-2012. Results offer support for the world culture/world polity theoretical framework, while economic development also impacts legislation. The global trend toward legislation is influenced by global, cultural, and economic factors.

 

Full text available here from Sociological Spectrum (subscription required).

Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China

BMC

Allison KC, Caplan A, Shapiro ME,  Els C, Paul NW, and Li H. (2015). Historical development and current status of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China. BMC Medical Ethics, 16:85


Abstract

Background: In December 2014, China announced that only voluntarily donated organs from citizens would be used for transplantation after January 1, 2015. Many medical professionals worldwide believe that China has stopped using organs from death-row prisoners.

Discussion: In the present article, we briefly review the historical development of organ procurement from death-row prisoners in China and comprehensively analyze the social-political background and the legal basis of the announcement. The announcement was not accompanied by any change in organ sourcing legislations or regulations. As a fact, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China. Even after January 2015, key Chinese transplant officials have repeatedly stated that death-row prisoners have the same right as regular citizens to “voluntarily donate” organs. This perpetuates an unethical organ procurement system in ongoing violation of international standards.

Conclusions: Organ sourcing from death-row prisoners has not stopped in China. The 2014 announcement refers to the intention to stop the use of organs illegally harvested without the consent of the prisoners. Prisoner organs procured with “consent” are now simply labelled as “voluntarily donations from citizens”. The semantic switch may whitewash sourcing from both death-row prisoners and prisoners of conscience. China can gain credibility only by enacting new legislation prohibiting use of prisoner organs and by making its organ sourcing system open to international inspections. Until international ethical standards are transparently met, sanctions should remain.

Read the complete paper courtesy of BMC Medical Ethics.

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