• Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    A crucial step has been taken to address growing concerns about the international trade of human organs as Australia passed its first anti-slavery bill in the New South Wales (NSW) upper house on May 3.

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    More than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh.

    In some parts of India such donations are increasingly saving lives. Donated organs are being transported across cities and even states by using “green corridors” that ensure that traffic is stopped to save vital minutes so that the organ is transplanted in time. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

  • Fank Inter Press Service | 30 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Maged Srour

    Human Trafficking for Organs: Ending abuse of the Poorest

    Organ transplantation is one of the most incredible medical achievements of the past century. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “human organs for transplants have two sources, deceased donors and living donors; ultimately, human organs can only be derived from a human body, and thus any action in the field of organ transplantation must be carried out in accordance with the highest ethical and professional standards”. The reality is that in several countries such as India, Pakistan, Egypt or Mexico, organ trafficking has been peaking in recent years...

  • NZ financial neutrality New Zealand Ministry of Health | 17 April 2018
    [page link]


    New Zealand covers costs of leave for living donors in the spirit of financial neutrality

    Summary of compensation procedure:

    You register for compensation with the Ministry of Health while you're being tested to become a donor.

    Then you apply for compensation for loss of earnings when you have a date for donation surgery.

    Please contact the Ministry as soon as possible if you would like to discuss your options. For further information, call the Ministry of Health: freephone 0800 855 066 or access their website here


  • CoE rejects GKE RT News | 08 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Euro chiefs brand US-backed health program as ‘organ trafficking’

    The Council of Europe’s Committee on Organ Transplantation has rejected a US-backed organ-swapping plan as “human organ trafficking” over concerns that donors will be abused. According to the committee, organ-swapping, as proposed by the Global Kidney Exchange (GKE), goes against the fundamental rule of organ donation – that “the human body and its parts shall not give rise to financial gain or comparable advantage.”

  • Proposed Bill on organtrafficking with extraterritorial implications Epoch Times | 17 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Janita Kan

    NSW Takes Crucial Step In Fight Against Human Organ Trafficking, Targets Crimes Overseas

    A crucial step has been taken to address growing concerns about the international trade of human organs as Australia passed its first anti-slavery bill in the New South Wales (NSW) upper house on May 3.

    Organ trafficking is a serious criminal offence in Australia but currently, state and commonwealth laws only prevent a person who is in Australia from engaging in an illegal trade of human organs. Loopholes in the legislation mean that if an Australia receives an organ in an illegal or unethical manner while overseas, they face no penalty when they return home.

  • India organ allocation Scroll.in | 09 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Sanjay Nagral

    Who gives, who lives? India’s organ transplant system continues to favour the rich

    More than 95% of organ transplants are currently performed in the private sector where costs range from Rs 20 lakh to Rs 25 lakh.

    In some parts of India such donations are increasingly saving lives. Donated organs are being transported across cities and even states by using “green corridors” that ensure that traffic is stopped to save vital minutes so that the organ is transplanted in time. Organs are being transplanted across gender, caste and religious identities. Given the divisive times we are going through in this country, shouldn’t we be celebrating such acts of solidarity and kinship?

  • South Koreans traveling for transplant Korea Biomedical Review | 05 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Marian Chu

    ‘South Korea indirectly fuels organ trafficking in China’

    South Koreans were one of the largest consumer groups of organ transplants in China, indirectly contributing to the unethical organ harvesting market there, speakers at a seminar said.

    The data on organ transplants were presented at the “Vital Link seminar,” hosted by the Korean Society for Transplantation, Vital Link, Korea Organ Donation Network, and the Korea Organ Donation Agency, at Seoul National University Hospital on Thursday...

  • Kosovo case Balkan Transitional Justice | 02 May 2018
    [read the article]


    By Dean B. Pineles

    Kosovo’s Medicus Case: Bad Omen for Rule of Law

    Six years of efforts to deliver justice were wasted when the defendants convicted in the Medicus organ-trafficking case were inexplicably sent for retrial, says a judge who served on the original trial panel.

  • Fank Inter Press Service | 30 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Maged Srour

    Human Trafficking for Organs: Ending abuse of the Poorest

    Organ transplantation is one of the most incredible medical achievements of the past century. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, “human organs for transplants have two sources, deceased donors and living donors; ultimately, human organs can only be derived from a human body, and thus any action in the field of organ transplantation must be carried out in accordance with the highest ethical and professional standards”. The reality is that in several countries such as India, Pakistan, Egypt or Mexico, organ trafficking has been peaking in recent years...

  • NZ financial neutrality New Zealand Ministry of Health | 17 April 2018
    [page link]


    New Zealand covers costs of leave for living donors in the spirit of financial neutrality

    Summary of compensation procedure:

    You register for compensation with the Ministry of Health while you're being tested to become a donor.

    Then you apply for compensation for loss of earnings when you have a date for donation surgery.

    Please contact the Ministry as soon as possible if you would like to discuss your options. For further information, call the Ministry of Health: freephone 0800 855 066 or access their website here


  • CoE rejects GKE RT News | 08 May 2018
    [read the article]


    Euro chiefs brand US-backed health program as ‘organ trafficking’

    The Council of Europe’s Committee on Organ Transplantation has rejected a US-backed organ-swapping plan as “human organ trafficking” over concerns that donors will be abused. According to the committee, organ-swapping, as proposed by the Global Kidney Exchange (GKE), goes against the fundamental rule of organ donation – that “the human body and its parts shall not give rise to financial gain or comparable advantage.”

  • Woman on trial for stealing human kidney Daily Monitor | 17 April 2018
    [read the article]


    By Juliet Kigongo

    Woman on trial for stealing human kidney

    A woman has been committed to the High Court for trial on charges of aggravated human trafficking and luring her shop attendant into donating his kidney to her husband. Miria Rwigambwa, a businesswoman in Mbarara District is accused by Brian Arinaitwe of duping and facilitating him to India for removal of his body part. The accused appeared before Nakawa Grade One Magistrate, Noah Sajjabi who committed her to the High Court for trial...

  • CoE Statement on GKE

    STATEMENT ON THE GLOBAL KIDNEY EXCHANGE CONCEPT


    To download a copy of the statement, please click here.


    The concept of Global Kidney Exchange (GKE) has been recently proposed as a means to increase the number of donor-recipient pairs that can benefit from kidney exchange programmes in highincome countries (HIC). The Council of Europe Committee on Organ Transplantation (CD-P-TO) with the support of the Council of Europe Committee on Bioethics (DHBIO) has carefully studied the GKE proposal. Read their conclusions here.

  • Update extended April

    Participate in the DICG public consultation concerning the Declaration of Istanbul (2018 Edition)


    To view the draft DoI (2018 Edition) and provide your feedback via our survey, please click here.

    Deadline 20 April 2018


     

    Please share your time and expertise with us, and provide feedback on our draft documents here.

Obtaining consensus regarding international transplantation continues to be difficult for pediatric centers in the United States

Screen Shot 2016-08-09 at 1.41.23 PM


2016; Epub 31st July

Lorts A, Ryan TD, Matheny Antommaria, AH, Lake M, & Bucuvalas J. 

Abstract:

Organ transplant is life-saving and any given organ may be valuable to a multitude of potential recipients. An allocation system must be used to reconcile the difference between supply and demand, and this system must take into account the impact that accepting international patients may have on the local system. The principles for allocation must be clear, equitable, provide utility and must be monitored so as to maintain public trust. The impact of the system on metrics deemed to be critical must be measured. Finally, strategies must take into account the local culture, size of the region to be supported, the number and experience of transplant centers, and the resources of the healthcare delivery system. Our focus is on the United States, recognizing that strategies and challenges may vary across countries.

Click here to read the complete article courtesy of Pediatric Transplantation.

Statement of the Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group Regarding Payments to Families of Deceased Organ Donors.

 

Transplantation Journal

AM Capron, FL Delmonico, B Domínguez-Gil, D Martin, GM Danovitch, and JR Chapman

2016; Epub June 28

Abstract:

Governmental and private programs that pay next of kin who give permission for the removal of their deceased relative's organs for transplantation exist in a number of countries. Such payments, which may be given to the relatives or paid directly for funeral expenses or hospital bills unrelated to being a donor, aim to increase the rate of donation. The Declaration of Istanbul Custodian Group-in alignment with the World Health Organization Guiding Principles and the Council of Europe Convention Against Trafficking in Human Organs-has adopted a new policy statement opposing such practices.

Payment programs are unwise because they produce a lower rate of donations than in countries with voluntary, unpaid programs; associate deceased donation with being poor and marginal in society; undermine public trust in the determination of death; and raise doubts about fair allocation of organs. Most important, allowing families to receive money for donation from a deceased person, who is at no risk of harm, will make it impossible to sustain prohibitions on paying living donors, who are at risk.

Payment programs are also unethical. Tying coverage for funeral expenses or healthcare costs to a family allowing organs to be procured is exploitative, not "charitable." Using payment to overcome reluctance to donate based on cultural or religious beliefs especially offends principles of liberty and dignity. Finally, while it is appropriate to make donation "financially neutral"-by reimbursing the added medical costs of evaluating and maintaining a patient as a potential donor-such reimbursement may never be conditioned on a family agreeing to donate.

To read and download this open access article, please click here.

 

Trade in kidneys is ethically intolerable

D.E. Martin


Indian Journal Medical Ethics

2016; Epub May 9

Abstract: In India, as in most countries where trade in human organs is legally prohibited, policies governing transplantation from living donors are designed to identify and exclude prospective donors who have a commercial interest in donation. The effective implementation of such policies requires resources, training and motivation on the part of health professionals responsible for organ procurement and transplantation. If professionals are unconvinced by or unfamiliar with the ethical justi cation of the relevant laws and policies, they may fail to perform a robust evaluation of prospective donors and transplant candidates, and to act on suspicions or evidence of illicit activities. I comment here on a recent paper by Aggarwal and Adhikary (2016), in which the authors imply that tolerance of illicit commercialism in living kidney donation programmes is not unreasonable, given the insuf ciency of kidneys available for transplantation. I argue that such tolerance is unethical not only because of the harmful consequences of kidney traf cking, but because professional tolerance of commercialism undermines public trust in organ procurement programmes and impairs the development of sustainable donation and transplant systems.

Read the complete paper here, courtesy of the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics.

Read the paper by Aggarwal and Adhikary here, courtesy of the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics.

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